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I had reported earlier that I have been having problems with my right ear. Three weeks of therapy (including blowing steroids up my nose) didn’t seem to help. What did seem to finally make a difference was flying to Phoenix last Friday. My ears “popped” on the flight out and since that time, while the ear is still somewhat stuffy, I’ve been able to successfully clear it.

I went back for my follow-up yesterday and the doctor has declared the congestion problem successfully resolved. That’s the good news. (Although I do need to ask him what to do when the congestion comes back,as it has been for about the last year, and whether or not this has anything at all to do with my RA as the culprit seems to be inflammation.)

The bad news is that he thinks I have some hearing loss in that ear. (I can almost guarantee that he’s right.) So in two days I get to go in and have my hearing checked. I haven’t had my hearing checked since the health fairs in grade school where they put headphones on your ears and made you listen to funny sounds. I don’t know that technology has changed the methodology much, but I would hope they’ve made some advancements in the decades since Mrs. Conley, my second grade teacher, ushered us all into the auditorium for our health screenings.

I have some trepidation about the test and the results and the “what comes next” if they find hearing loss. But I have qualms in another area. This is my first experience with this doctor, and I’m not sure he’s a “keeper”. I’m very particular about my health care providers and I don’t mind seeing a “non-keeper” on an occasional basis for something minor. But hearing loss sounds like a long-term commitment. At the moment, I don’t feel like I’ve even been kissed, much less ready to go to the altar.

There are some things I like about him (besides the fact that he’s apparently a very qualified physician). For example, after my exam he walked with me up to the reception desk to make the appointment for the hearing test. When given the choice of an 8:15 or a 10:30 appointment, he leaned over and whispered to me, “Take the 8:15, so that way I’ll have time to review the results and can call you the same day.” Needless to say, I took the 8:15, but I was impressed that he took the time to personally explain to the receptionist what should be scheduled and gave me that important extra piece of information.

We’ll see how I feel after Thursday.

So that’s all I know for now. I hope that whatever news you hear today brings a smile to your lips and lightness in your step. Thanks for checking in.