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We’ve officially been back from the UK for two weeks and now that my time zones are finally back in sync, I thought I ought to post about the trip. First of all it was a great vacation but it took a lot out of us physically. My husband and I are finally at the point that this is probably the last big European vacation we’ll take. (We have a small trip scheduled for Thanksgiving, but would probably cancel that if it wasn’t so costly to do so.) After this, I think you’ll find us staying on this side of the pond and laying on the beach.

London

London

We flew over on our 20th wedding anniversary. Our first stop was London where we basically took a two-night breather before heading on to Edinburgh, Scotland. Last year we went directly through London on to Florence, Italy and it almost did us in. We learned that lesson well. This year, we built in some strategic “rest” days throughout the trip.

After the initial “landing” in London, we took the train up to Edinburgh. Travel by train is so much easier than dealing with airports and planes and it gave us the opportunity to see some of the UK countryside that we hadn’t visited before.

The weather was great and once we got out of the London area into the countryside, the landscape

UK Countryside

UK Countryside

was dotted with sheep. There were mother ewes, still fat in their winter covering of wool, along with scores of frolicking baby lambs. The land got more hilly the further north we traveled.

 

In Edinburgh, we stayed in a newly developed area called the Quarter Mile. Along with our hotel, it is filled with restaurants and shops and is close to both the University and one of the major parks in the city. Close by is Greyfriar’s Kirk, where Greyfriar’s Bobby is buried.

Edinburgh is fairly compact and even though we were close to easy bus routes, it was also only a 20-minute walk to the center of town which is filled with amazing history and culture.

Greyfriars with the Edinburgh castle in the background.

Greyfriars with the Edinburgh castle in the background.

 

Edinburgh is amazingly hilly and steep. We planned more than one excursion based on whether we were going uphill or downhill. The wonderful, hardy Scots didn’t seem to have any problems negotiating the terrain, but we old, fat Americans huffed and puffed our way through our visit.

Stairs are a common site in Edinburgh

Stairs are a common site in Edinburgh

 

Midway through our stay in Edinburgh, we took the train to Glasgow for the day. You don’t notice it so much in Edinburgh, but once outside the area, you realize that Scotland really is a different country. Signs, like this one at a train station, start showing up in the native language. I don’t completely understand the differences between Gaelic, Scottish, and Celtic, so I won’t try to explain. If you live there, you understand. 🙂

Differences in Language

Differences in Language

After five days in Edinburgh, we flew back to London for the rest of our vacation.

We stayed in the wonderful St. Ermin’s hotel where we stayed last year. It’s convenient to everything and the hotel and staff are lovely.

The "Bee Hotel" at St. Ermin's

The “Bee Hotel” at St. Ermin’s

To us, London is a lot like coming home. We ate at some of our favorite restaurants and visited some of our favorite sites. We took in a couple of photography exhibitions — one at the Natural History Museum and one at the Somerset House on the Strand.

Olympic Village, London

Olympic Village, London

The real highlight of the trip, was getting to meet the great Pollyanna Penguin. Polly, an RA advocate in the UK, has chronicled this meeting much better than I could do here. We took a train up to Norwich, a town close to her, and she met us for lunch and a walk through the market. It’s amazing how much we have in common across the pond, but how different things are due to National Healthcare vs. health insurance.

If there were any disappointments, it was that we didn’t make the day trip to Brussels we had planned. Brussels is only a two-hour train trip from London, but due to the recent terrorist attacks, we opted to skip that trip. It was a good thing because I took the day as a “rest” day, which I badly needed. There were days on the trip where I walked almost six miles. My joints aren’t used to that kind of activity and I was really feeling the extra stress even with my traveling companions, prednisone and Voltaren gel.

It was a wonderful, wonderful two-week trip. If it’s going to be our last to the UK, then it was a great one to go out on. And while it was filled with enjoyment and adventures, it was also a real wake-up call about the state of my RA. While I make it through my day-to-day life, I seem to have gone from “absolutely will” to “probably not” when considering many of the more strenuous things I used to do. All that being said, I’m glad I got to do them when I was able.

I hope whatever adventures you’ve had in your life have been amazing. Thanks for checking in.

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